About the trial...

We are working to shape the medical care of early stage Dupuytren's disease by investigating the first targeted therapy involving a simple injection for patients with the condition that we believe will preserve hand function and avoid the need for subsequent more invasive treatments such as surgery.

Our team from the University of Oxford led by Professor Nanchahal has unravelled the molecular mechanisms that initiate and maintain the disease process. Based on these findings we are studying a new treatment for early Dupuytren's disease called anti-TNF, a drug currently approved for use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This research study is called RIDD (Repurposing Anti-TNF for Dupuytren's Disease).

The Dose-Response part of the RIDD study used different doses of anti-TNF to investigate the effects on Dupuytren's cells. Participants had advanced disease and were due to have surgery to remove the diseased tissue. The removed cells were then examined in our lab. This part of the study is now complete.  Based on a positive signal we are proceeding with the next part of the study. Data from this part of the study will be published as soon as possible.

We are now recruiting people with early stage disease to take part in the early disease part of the RIDD study to see if anti-TNF can slow or prevent the progression of Dupuytren’s disease.

If effective, this will represent the first targeted therapy involving a simple injection for patients with early Dupuytren’s disease that will preserve hand function and avoid the need for subsequent more invasive treatments such as surgery.

Further details about what participating in the trial involves are available here.

We are inviting people with early Dupuytren’s disease who have nodules in their hands which have changed within the last 3 to 6 months to contact us for more details about joining our research study.